Tonight’s Sky: May 2012

| November 5, 2012 | 18 Comments

Backyard stargazers get a monthly guide to the northern hemisphere’s skywatching events with “Tonight’s Sky.” May brings us the Eta Aquarid meteor shower and a solar eclipse. “Tonight’s Sky” is produced by HubbleSite.org, online home of the Hubble Space Telescope. This is a recurring show, and you can find more episodes — and other astronomy videos — at HubbleSite.org. Visit Tonight’s Sky on HubbleSite. hubblesite.org
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  1. 0palineblue says:

    THIS IS INFORMATIVE AND VERY GOOD – THANKYOU

  2. aaron hicks says:

    in the west right that fucking bright star looking thing is venus right

  3. Qjemuse says:

    venus is shinning so bright tonight and im from a city where you dont even see one single star most the time

  4. ahannnnn says:

    I observed Scorpius and Libra constellations one month before at 2:00Am it was so clear.they are rising but not dominant in May i think.i do not have to up till mid night to observe them in july.

  5. eden11234 says:

    In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth

  6. notbydesign029 says:

    i NEED a telescope!!! But what kind and where’s a legit place to get one?

  7. TheMorrowwind says:

    I have a scope myself. It’s an 8″ Orion Dobsonian. I would highly recommend it to anyone looking for a cheap (under $500) scope that can do it all. Whatever you do, don’t buy one of those department store scopes that promise x600 magnification. You WILL be disappointed. Do some research before you buy anything, and enjoy the view!

  8. ProjectsBlack says:

    I dont know where you live, but we should have a great summer to do it in the UK from what ive been told, so im getting a scope this year, only a cheap one, but it should do the trick :)

  9. MrJordaanxxx says:

    Nice overview.

  10. TheMorrowwind says:

    It’s nice to see that there ARE some intelligent people on YouTube. Concerning Scorpius and Libra, they will probably be covered in June or July, as that is the time of year that they begin to rise before midnight.

  11. ahannnnn says:

    There is no information about constellation of libra and scorpius……why???

  12. ProjectsBlack says:

    Maybe the angular momentum would create the illusion of a red-shift, rather than simply moving away from us in a straight line to give us red-shift, our position in a rotation(either more central or external in comparison to another galaxy) at a different position could maybe create this…think about this, the suns magnetic field rotates at a different speed at the pole than it does at the equator. Im not saying its all wrong, but we shouldn’t leave the door closed to ideas.

  13. Myglowplug says:

    At the end of a realy bad day this vedio made me fell human again , thank you , I love them all !

  14. ProjectsBlack says:

    Contd…i think testing should be possible without satellite or telescope observation. If the universe is rotating is should have a default electric charge.

  15. ProjectsBlack says:

    Hi and thanks for the reply. Its an alternate theory of mine regarding matter field rotation, plus if a matter field or universe expanded after the big bang, it must have expanded into something else. I think the pressure of the vacuum should reflect the amount of inflation after the big bang. Rotation could explain matters inertia/mass increases of matter at velocity counteracting the rotation and not a gravitational field. I think gravity is local to matter and the mass simply warps the field

  16. SojournerLi says:

    I’m no expert. Wouldn’t a rotating universe imply an axis or point to be rotating around. Meaning that there would have to be a massive gravitational pull causing this rotation as it curves spacetime. Our universe would be contracting into a center like a spiral galaxy. Unlike expansion with its ever growing sphere. Am I even close? If most galaxies are redshifted in all directions, aren’t we that center? The arena’s so big, it seems almost impossible to test these theories in our current state.

  17. nickharvey7 says:

    Very nice indeed!!!

  18. Mr Noniee says:

    OMG cool vid. !

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